The Limits of Religion and How It Informs the Religious Response to Climate Change

Part of addressing climate change is the technical challenges. The methods of science and engineering have proven themselves to be far more capable in providing probable solutions to climate change than religion. The sacred foundational texts and the subsequent holy documents were never envisioned as scientific directives. Even when droughts threatened and bubonic plagues charged down the Silk Road, all the religions from China to Europe were not capable of investigating the sources and resolving the crises. Modern science and engineering are late in the history of religion, and all our technical solutions are recent.

Another part of addressing climate change is a question of which government policies to implement. The Hebrew Bible knew only kings and tyrants, judging monarchs good or bad based on their worship of Adonai God. Solomon is mentioned as imposing heavy taxes and forcing onerous conscription to build his temple, but he is judged as a good king based solely on his choice of building a temple to Adonai God. Economics and government policies are not part of the religious foundations.

When a recession descends upon a country, whether the country is Iran, Saudi Arabia, India or Italy, there are only a few reasonable choices the government has available to effectively address the crisis. Bringing a country out of recession looks similar around the world and the dominant religion of the country has no bearing on the government course of action. Certainly, believers pray to God that the policies work, but the choice of policies is not a religious call.

Religions are at its best when they identify the sacred values of solving a crisis such as global warming. Religion has always had a unifying power, bringing people together for a cause. Religion at its best creates identity and nobility of the cause. Religion can drive the conversation in the public square and religion can reframe cacophony of self-interested voices (such as the fossil fuel industry), giving clear perspectives on the choices we must make.

The world does not need or want a Jewish, a Muslim, or a Christian solution to the global climate pandemic. The world needs a religious voice clarifying the sacred tasks that must be undertaken. The world needs a clear moral direction that can overcome the forces of greed and nationalism at this critical juncture.

Raising a religious voice in a time of unchecked nationalism and political partisanship is daunting. Religious people are dismissed with causal disdain, which is why the moral vacuum must be reclaimed. We must raise our religious voices in the public square and in our legislator’s offices (even if remotely). What good is all our protestations and claims of piety if we do not speak our faiths to our governments and our fellows to address the climate?

Addressing Climate Change Simulator

Can we save the planet from its current projection of 4.1 degrees centigrade by 2100? You bet. This interactive simulator lets you tinker with all the possible solutions that are available today. Experiment! (Look for the big blue button on the right for the SIMULATOR, which is often updated.)

Voting by Climate Change

A candidate for U.S. Senate in Colorado has posted an ad that offers an apocalyptic version of climate change. This is the first election cycle where climate change is thrust forward as a primary issue. Hopefully, this election strategy will spread to other campaigns. Four minutes long.

Cup of Tea?

Love your tea? Don’t use a teabag. The teabag used today is a paper product infused with plastic to keep it from disintegrating. What could take away the joy of a cup of tea more than seven million bits of micro-plastic? Yum.

Under Counting Micro-plastics

The counting of micro-plastics in the world’s oceans is off by a magnitude of 5x to 7x. New research using a bucket instead of a net to collect samples sends the count exponentially skyward.

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